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Infinite Cat Project Archives for May 25-29, 2015.

Mewsings


May 25, 2015: "The cat has too much spirit to have no heart" - Ernest Menault

Today's
Gratuitous
Dish O' Kute
Kittiness



cat with resting bitch face

An excellent feline example of 'resting bitch face'.

Cat
Mew-vies




When you REALLY love your cat.



Kurrent
Kitty
Komic


the cat always wins



Meowcellaneous
Feline
Department



stray cat

The New Stray Cat
By Tim Dowling

I am in a Birmingham Travelodge with the band I’m in, between two gigs. With the remains of our non-complementary breakfast spread out before us, we turn our backs on one another and crouch over our phones, taking the opportunity to deal with any family or work problems that have accumulated overnight.

I study a text from my wife that says, “stray cat alert”, accompanied by a picture of a cat. The cat, I cannot help but notice, is asleep on our sofa. There is a second picture in which the stray cat is being cuddled by the youngest one. I call my wife.

“Don’t worry, I think I’m about to get rid of it,” she says. The cat, she tells me, was found by a friend in the middle of Uxbridge Road. It’s unclear why it’s presently at our house.

“We don’t need any more animals,” I say.

“I’ve mounted an Instagram campaign,” she says. “There’s a lot of interest.”

“That’s good,” I say.

“It is very sweet, though,” she says.

“I can see,” I say.

“It’s called Ottilie,” she says.

“Uh-oh,” I say.

As our van heads north to the next gig, I recall some of the other abandoned animals that have crossed our threshold over the years: the unwanted, the traumatised, the insane. There was the panicked pair of low-slung dogs that spent an afternoon trashing our kitchen before the RSPCA turned up. There was the tailless grey cat that, for better or worse, is still our cat. There was the scarred, smelly and frankly hideous staffy cross that I found tied to some railings one night and was wrong-footed into taking home. It was just after Christmas, a time of year when even death row has a waiting list. My wife stared into its scabby face as it sat wheezing in the middle of the sitting room.

“I’m going to call you Pearl,” she said.

Pearl lived with us for 72 hours, most of it spent at my side, gazing up at me with boundless longing and drooling on my shoes. Eventually my wife found Pearl a place in a shelter. That afternoon she came up to my office and slipped a lead over the dog’s enormous head.

“Say goodbye to your little friend,” she said.

“It’s not my friend,” I said.

“I wasn’t talking to you,” she said.

When I arrive home on Saturday afternoon the stray cat has already gone to new and allegedly delighted owners.

“Really?” I say. “I didn’t even meet it.”

“It was terribly sweet,” my wife says.

“We should have kept it,” the middle one says.

“You can only have so many animals,” my wife says. “There’s a tipping point, and we’ve crossed it.” I turn to look at the little dog, which is perched on the back of the sofa behind my head.

“You were the tipping point,” I say.

“I would trade that dog for the stray cat,” the middle one says.

“I would trade this dog for a handful of magic beans,” I say.

“Would they even have to be magic, though?” the middle one asks.

“No,” I say. “I would accept most tinned varieties.”

“Stop it,” my wife says, clapping her hands twice. The little dog leaps from one sofa to another and curls up in her lap. I tell myself I’m pleased not to have met the stray cat, because it means I will never have to think about it in the way I sometimes still think about Pearl.

“I said I’d get rid of the cat, and I did,” my wife says.

“You can get rid of anything,” I say.

“Yes,” she says. “I can.”




Mewsings


May 26, 2015: "No amount of time can erase the memory of a good cat, and no amount of masking tape can ever totally remove his fur from your couch." - Leo Dworken

Today's
Gratuitous
Dish O' Kute
Kittiness



cat with resting bitch face

Organized cats for the modern cat-owner.

Cat
Mew-vies




Loki goes for a walk.



Kurrent
Kitty
Komic


cat comic of mice and men



Mewsings


May 27, 2015: "A cat can be trusted to purr when she is pleased, which is more than can be said for human beings." - William Ralph Inge

Today's
Gratuitous
Dish O' Kute
Kittiness



cat in sink

"Good morning to you, too."

Cat
Mew-vies




Helpful tip: Don't mess with the cat.



Kurrent
Kitty
Komic


the feeds



Meowcellaneous
Feline
Department



UTI in cats

8 Things You Should Know About Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease
By Jane A Kelley

So, your cat just peed all over the carpet. You may think she’s being naughty or trying to tell you that she’s “pissed off” about something, but you’d be wrong. The odds are good that the reason she did it is because she’s suffering from feline lower urinary tract disorder, or FLUTD. But what is FLUTD, and what can you do about it?


1. FLUTD is a term that describes several problems

Urinary tract symptoms could result from crystals or stones, a urinary tract infection, trauma, a tumor, a congenital abnormality, an obstruction, or idiopathic cystitis. There’s no way to know why a cat is having urinary symptoms without a visit to the vet.


2. The most frustrating of these problems is feline idiopathic cystitis


“Idiopathic” means the cause of the problem is unknown. Urinalysis may not reveal any infection or stones, but the cat is clearly suffering. Some vets believe stress is a trigger for FIC episodes, so it’s important to minimize the stress experienced by a FLUTD-prone cat.
A urinalysis is a critical first step in diagnosing and treating urinary tract problems.


3. Some of the symptoms can be hard to associate with FLUTD


Most of us know to look for symptoms like running back and forth to the litter box, genital licking, blood in the urine, and straining to urinate. However, cats with urinary issues can engage in inappropriate urination -- peeing over drains is fairly common, presumably because the cool air coming from the drain may be comforting -- “barbering” of the fur on the lower abdomen, and even incontinence.


4. If you do no other diagnostic tests, at least have the vet do a urinalysis

The only way you and your vet can know for sure if your cat has a urinary tract infection or a different problem is by examining a urine sample. Just by looking at your cat’s urine to see if it’s cloudy or has blood and mucus in it, your vet will be able to tell a lot. If your vet does find bacteria in your cat’s urine, she may recommend a culture and sensitivity test to find out which antibiotics will kill the bacteria, something important to know because many bacteria are becoming antibiotic-resistant.

This cat has crystals and stones blocking his bladder, so he's being catheterized to get the urine out and flush the bladder to get rid of any other stones and crystals.


5. Most young cats don’t actually have infections


Vets may prescribe antibiotics for a cat with FLUTD, but research has revealed that the vast majority of young-adult to middle-age cats do not actually have bacteria in their urine.


6. On the other hand, most old cats do have infections

Senior and geriatric cats are much more prone to infections. Illnesses like diabetes and kidney disease cause the urine to be more watery than usual, which means its natural germ-fighting qualities don’t work as well. Bacteria that travel from the outside of the body up the urethra and into the bladder have a nice, warm place to reproduce like crazy.
The cone of shame is a small price to pay for not being in pain anymore.


7. FLUTD episodes warrant a same-day vet visit

Urinary tract problems can become very serious, very quickly, especially in male cats. Males have longer, narrower urethras than females and as a result could experience a potentially fatal complete blockage. If a male cat is having urinary symptoms, take him to the vet right away, even if that means a midnight trip to the emergency clinic.


8. Prevention is the best cure

Keep the risk of urinary tract problems low by providing plenty of fresh, clean filtered water. Since cats have a very low thirst drive, add some canned food to your cat’s diet. Litter boxes should be cleaned regularly in order to stop bacteria from building up and to prevent the cat from avoiding the box because it’s dirty. I also recommend having multiple litter boxes in different rooms so that cat territory conflicts don’t cause stress.




Mewsings


May 28, 2015: "Cats do not have to be shown how to have a good time, for they are unfailing ingenious in that respect." - James Mason

Today's
Gratuitous
Dish O' Kute
Kittiness



cat wanting to play catch

"Whaddaya MEAN you don't want to play catch?"

Cat
Mew-vies




Everybody sing along!



Kurrent
Kitty
Komic


cat licking itself




Mewsings


May 29, 2015: "A little drowsing cat is an image of perfect beatitude." - Jules Champfleury

Today's
Gratuitous
Dish O' Kute
Kittiness



cat in sink

Art by Banksy

Cat
Mew-vies




Nine cats, twenty boxes



Kurrent
Kitty
Komic


chicken giblets



Meowcellaneous
Feline
Department



UTI in cats

The Cat Peed In My Suitcase
By Jolie Kerr

Q: Here’s the situation: My wife and I thought it was really cute to let our cat play in our roll-on suitcase: She pokes her head out and loves hiding in there. Fast-forward to two weeks later, and we smell a rank odor coming from the direction of the suitcase. I nervously smell it, and voilà, cat urine. How do we clean this suitcase? It’s so odd-shaped, and we can’t stick it in the wash. What do we do? Help!!


A: I have ideas, I do, that I believe will work to remove the cat pee from your suitcase. But I also have some concerns, and I guess I’ll just go ahead and tell you what they are now, because otherwise I’ll spend the entire writing of this answer feeling nervous and upset. My concern is this: If the suitcase has a cardboard liner that helps to give it structure, the thing may be a goner, as cat-pee-soaked cardboard is pretty much unsalvageable. Now, you may not know what materials, precisely, the suitcase is made of, but I feel that the cardboard-lining thing is something I should mention at the onset before moving on to cleaning instructions, in the event that you do know precisely what the suitcase is made of, and want to save yourself time and effort.

If you’re still with me, the good news is that cleaning the suitcase out should be fairly easy work. A bit of elbow grease is required, but really only a bit—set aside maybe 30 minutes for this operation. Not bad, right? I’m going to break the instructions down into three separate parts: The first one is what you’ll want to remember if you have a soiled suitcase that doesn’t involve a cat pee situation (such as, say, an exploding tube of suntan lotion, or bottle of illegally smuggled Italian olive oil).

Scrub It

It’s also the step that requires the elbow grease, though I promise you won’t even need too much of that: You’re going to scrub the suitcase, inside and out. You’ll need a cleaning product, a small bowl or bucket, and a scrub brush. This style of scrub brush is one good option; a set like this is another, especially for suitcases that are oddly shaped or have tricky corners. An old toothbrush will also work.

The idea, as you’ve probably gathered, is that you’ll dip the scrub brush in cleaning solution diluted with water in that small bowl or bucket, and chh-chh-chh the suitcase. Once you’ve given the luggage a really thorough scrubbing, dump out the cleaning solution, refill your bowl or bucket with water, and, using a clean rag or sponge, wipe the residue away, wringing the rag or sponge frequently, and replacing the water if necessary.

But what cleaning product to use!?! Well, in the case of the cat pee, use something like Nature’s Miracle, which is an enzymatic pet-odor-removing product. There are others like it on the market, so if you can’t get Nature’s Miracle in your neck of the woods, look for any pet- or human-odor-neutralizing spray that’s enzymatic-based.

If your suitcase mess is greasy or oily in nature, use a good grease-cutting dish soap like Dawn, or a product like Pine Sol or Lestoil (which are great on grease), or even a small amount of ammonia diluted in water. That should do you just fine.

If the mess is of a powdery nature because your bronzer or Gold Bond or kilo of cocaine spilled, try to vacuum up or knock out as much as you can before wiping the interior out with a damp rag or sponge, and then scrub with dish soap or diluted laundry detergent to remove any residual staining. If you go the vacuum route, a hand vac or the use of a crevice tool is suggested.

Dry the suitcase as well as you can using a clean towel, and then allow to air dry completely before packing or storing it.

Sun It


If it’s an option for you to do so, drying the suitcase in the sun is strongly recommended for two reasons. The first is that it will dry faster that way, and exposure to fresh air will further help in your deodorizing efforts. The second is that sunlight itself will act as an odor neutralizer, which is helpful to know for all sorts of reasons.

Litter It

Kitty litter will also absorb odors, which makes a lot of sense when you think about it, but probably isn’t the kind of thing you sit around thinking about. That’s fine! If you did sit around and think about stuff like that, you wouldn’t need me, and I very much enjoy being needed.

In the case of the cat-peed-upon suitcase, I still want its owners to give it a scrub, but if any odors linger after the fact, tossing a few cups of clean kitty litter inside the luggage, zipping it up, and allowing it to sit for 12-48 hours will go a long way in removing smells. The same is true of using straight up activated charcoal, or even baking soda. The litter method is also a really good one to remember in the event that anything overly perfumed leaks in your luggage, as even a really thorough scrubbing may leave behind a noticeable scent. Once the litter has done its work, dump it into the garbage or, I suppose, into your cat’s litter box (waste not, want not!) and wipe the interior free of any dust using a damp rag or sponge.





 




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