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Infinite Cat Project Archives for October 17-21, 2016.


Mewsings: October 17, 2016 - "There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer


cat in crib

Gratuitous Kute Kittiness: "I'm the baby! gotta love me!"




Cat Mewvie: Boom Boom can sing sing.
 

cat hair on dresses comic

Today's Kitty Komic


judith lieber cat purse

Feline Art: "Crystal Socks Purse" by Judith Leiber.


howard stern loves cats

Howard Stern has fostered over 300 cats.
By Jennifer Gould

“King of All Media” Howard Stern is worth $600 million but when he comes home to his beautiful wife, Beth, he’s on his hands and knees — cleaning up cat litter and fur from their dozens of rescue animals.

The couple have so far fostered more than 300 cats and kittens in the past three years alone in their Upper West Side apartment and Hamptons home.

“He’s the one who wants us to foster more cats even after I say no. Howard helps me socialize the kittens and he has been known to clean litter boxes. The kittens love his hair!” Beth Stern says.

“Sometimes,” she adds, “I get jealous when he’s not listening to me but loving the cats!”
It may come as a surprise to those who know Stern just from his raunchy Sirius XM radio show that “Howard was always a huge animal lover — but marrying me has taken it to a whole other level,” Beth says.

“Our blind resident cat Sophia is madly in love with Howard, and as soon as she hears his voice when he comes in the door, she runs to him. They have a special game they play every day with a toy mouse on a string. He always drops what he’s doing to play with her. It’s so sweet.”

Howard Stern and Beth Ostrosky Stern pose with a kitten.

Gorgeous Beth, 44, was always concerned about saving animals, even while working as a child model at age 9 in her hometown of Fox Chapel, Pa.

She attended the University of Pittsburgh, where she majored in English literature.

“I wanted to be an English teacher,” she said. But Elite New Faces from New York came scouting for local talent, and invited her to New York.

Modeling took her to Paris, Greece and Germany. She was soon cast in films like “Flirting With Disaster.” But, she says, “I would never consider myself an actress. I am a horrible actress.”
When she was 26, single and living in New York, she met Howard, the man of her dreams, at a dinner party at Mercer Kitchen. They married in 2008.

“I was always an animal lover,” she says. “I grew up with rescue dogs, cats, guinea pigs and chickens.”

“He knew how important animals are to me and how strongly I feel about rescuing animals and saving lives. Howard is my partner in this in every way.”

For more than a decade, Beth has been volunteering for North Shore Animal League America. She is now their national spokesperson.

“We are saving lives — and there are so many more to save,” she said.

The Sterns are currently funding an expansion of NSAL, in the name of Bianca, their 10-year-old English bulldog who died in 2012.

Howard once said that Bianca “completed” them as a couple. Now they are creating Bianca’s Furry Friends Feline Adoption and Wellness Center — 14,000 square feet of cage-free living. Rachael Ray and Billy Joel each donated $1 million to the center.

Beth is also hosting her fourth annual Kitten Bowl for Hallmark Channel, which airs before the Super Bowl. One hundred cats and kittens are up for adoption that day, and “we find homes for all of them,” Beth said.

She also hosts the American Humane Association’s Hero Dog Awards. Last year, her co-host was James Denton. The show, on Hallmark Channel, leaves her in tears.

“There’s not a dry eye in the audience,” she says.

As far as the rescue animals the Sterns take into their home, “Howard names them,” Beth says — like Honey Nut and Cheerio for two kittens that they wanted to keep together. And after seriously vetting adoptive families, Beth delivers the cats and kittens to their new homes.

“I’m really good at matching cats and kittens to their ‘forever families,’” she says. She just matched Jerry Seinfeld and his family with a foster kitten. Now she’s looking for Rosie O’Donnell as well as David Burtka and Neil Patrick Harris.

Fostering, she says, has brought a depth to her own life that she is thankful for.








Mewsings: October 18, 2016 - "Cats are creatures that express a multitude of moods and attitudes."
- Karen Brademeyer



cat with hanger on head

Gratuitous Kittiness: "Ooooh. So maddeningly snugly"






Cat Mewvie: "Where IS that dang bird?"
 

cast is a snake comic

Today's Kitty Komic


cat by Daine Irvine Armitage

Feline Art: "Tuxedo Cat" by Diane Invine Armitage.




Mewsings: October 19, 2016 - "Which is more beautiful--feline movement or feline stillness?"
- Elizabeth Hamilton



fluffy kitten

Gratuitous Kittiness: Fluffy little baby.





Cat Mewvie: Big cat sounds... TURN IT UP!
 

cat lying positions

Today's Kitty Komic


cat by Rebecca Korpita

Feline Art: "Fat Cat" by Rebecca Korpita.


space cat

The First and Only Cat in Space.
By Chris Boex

Many people know that the first living creature to orbit the Earth was a dog, launched into space by the Soviets all the way back in 1957. But less well known is that French researchers also sent their own animals into space -- including the first 'cat-stronaut.'

The early days of spaceflight were filled with uncertainty. Rockets frequently blew up and no one knew how, or even if, people would be able to survive in a weightless environment. So scientists began sending animals into space to see how they'd survive, though it was a one-way trip for many of them.

For Americans, the animals of choice were monkeys. 'Albert,' a rhesus monkey, was the first animal in space when he was launched from the White Sands Missile Range on a suborbital flight. It would be three more years before a monkey would survive one of these flights, though.

Meanwhile, the Soviets used a variety of mice, rats, and rabbits for their initial tests before settling on dogs. They launched a pair of canines on a suborbital mission in 1951, and safely recovered both. Eventually, the Moscow stray dog Laika rode into orbit aboard Sputnik 2, but she died as expected when she ran out of air.

Once humans made it into space in 1961, animals were relegated to lower profile biomedical missions. The U.S. and Soviet Union proceeded to race to the moon, but other countries made strides into space, too.

France was among the nations also building their own rockets. They chose cats as the animals for their spaceflight trials -- a team of around 14 felines was trained to fly aboard a Veronique AGI rocket for biological research.

The giant leap for cat-kind came on October 18, 1963. Just after 8 a.m., the rocket blasted off from Algeria carrying Félicette, a black and white female cat who had been found on the streets of Paris.

Félicette's suborbital flight lasted 15 minutes and reached an altitude of 97 miles. She was recovered safely after the capsule parachuted back to Earth making her the first and only known cat in space.






Mewsings: October 20, 2016 - "There is no such thing as 'just a cat'." - Robert A. Heinlein


cat in round bed

Gratuitous Kittiness: "Perfect fit!"





Cat Mewvie: Silly kitty.
 

cat wanting belly rub comic

Today's Kitty Komic


decorative line-art cat

Feline Art: Decorative line-art cat.


Mewsings: October 21, 2016 - "The reason cats climb is so that they can look down on almost every other animal...it's also the reason they hate birds." - K.C. Buffington


cute gray kitten

Gratuitous Kute Kittiness: When you dream, dream big.




Cat Mewvie: A Simon's Cat Halloween special.
 

cat attacks spider comic

Today's Kitty Komic


cat painting by Kimberly Brooks

Feline Art: "Pumpkin'" by Kimberly Brooks.


boston cat virus

Potentially fatal cat-virus outbreak in Boston area.
By Jen Krausz

Boston, MA - Boston area cats have been showing up recently in veterinary clinics with panleukopenia, a potentially fatal virus to which only cats are susceptible.

The sick animals have been concentrated in the Walk Hill Street area of Mattapan, The Boston Globe reported. The cat virus causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite and affects mostly young cats and kittens.

Cats infected with the virus need to be quarantined to avoid spreading it to healthy cats. Panleukopenia is highly contagious to other cats who have not been infected previously, but cats are immune to future infections from the virus if they get it and survive, according to PetMD.

One of the most common symptoms of panleukopenia is anemia due to the way the virus affects the blood cells. Cats who are completely uninterested in eating, are lethargic, and are having vomiting and diarrhea should be checked by a veterinarian right away.

The virus is transmitted when cats have contact with blood, feces, urine, or fleas from an infected cat. People who do not wash their hands appropriately between handling cats may also pass on the virus, even though humans cannot become infected.

Panleukopenia, also known as feline distemper, can be prevented through vaccinations. The Animal Rescue League in combination with the Massachusetts Animal Fund and Boston Animal Care and Control will have a free feline distemper vaccine clinic in Mattapan on Saturday, October 22, 2016, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., according to WCVB. Clinic organizers request that cats be brought to the clinic in carriers, which are available for borrowing if owners don’t have one.





 




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